Category Archives: Weather Dangers

What is the “Ice Bowl”?

The “Ice Bowl” refers to the National Football League’s championship game between the Green Bay Packers and the Dallas Cowboys that occurred on Dec. 31, 1967, at Lambeau Field in Green Bay.

The game was for the NFL title. The Packers entered the contest as the two-time defending NFL champions trying to become the first team in the league history to win three consecutive championships. Continue reading

Category: Seasons, Severe Weather, Weather Dangers

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Will spring temperatures affect the COVID-19 outbreak?

The COVID-19 outbreak continues to expand across the U.S. and globally. What happens when spring and warmer weather arrives?

Some viral respiratory diseases, such as influenza, are seasonal, and cases decrease in the spring and summer. However, we do not know what to expect from the new coronavirus that causes COVID-19. Continue reading

Category: Meteorology, Phenomena, Weather Dangers

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What is a fire cloud?

With the raging fires in Australia, you may have heard news reports of pyrocumulus, or fire clouds.

In Latin, pyro means “fire” and cumulus means “pile up.” Cumulus is a type of cloud that is common in Wisconsin, particularly in summer. Cumulus clouds are those puffy white clouds with tops that have a cauliflower appearance. Continue reading

Category: Meteorology, Phenomena, Severe Weather, Weather Dangers

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What is with the hot temperatures in Europe?

Europe recorded its hottest June ever.

The hottest temperatures occurred June 26-28, resulting from a high-pressure system that settled over Europe combined with hot winds from the Sahara Desert in Africa. France observed temperatures in excess of 113 degrees for the first time since temperatures were recorded. Continue reading

Category: Meteorology, Weather Dangers

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Why was the sky hazy on Thursday and Friday?

There have been large forest fires in northern Alberta, Canada, and the smoke has drifted over the Midwest, including Wisconsin.

Smoke can cause the sky to appear hazy, even if the smoke is high above the ground. The smoke scatters sunlight to make the sunlight diffuse and grayish. When the smoke is thick, it can cause brilliant red sunsets and sunrises, as it did on Thursday. When light beams interact with particles suspended in air, the light can be scattered or absorbed. Continue reading

Category: Phenomena, Weather Dangers

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